Layered yoghurt jars with homemade almond butter & oat granola

Layered yoghurt jars with homemade almond butter & oat granola :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Sometimes we just need a little inspiration to make something quick, beautiful and delicious out of very few simple ingredients. Right? Especially on a Monday.

I mean – raise your hand if you too frequently have granola for dinner? Or lunch? Let’s just admit it, we simply don’t have the time to cook fancy dishes all of the time – no matter how much we would love to do just that. That’s at least true when it comes to me and my little family.

Layered yoghurt jars make me happy, because they are pretty much the same thing we would normally put in a bowl – only prettier and therefore more fun to eat. Plus, everybody loves them and you can easily customize the jars to each individual’s liking. And best of all, they can be thrown together in almost no time!

Now start getting creative with what you have at home! Below are some suggestions from my pantry.

Enjoy!

Layered yoghurt jars with homemade almond butter & oat granola

Greek or Turkish yoghurt, unsweetened
Almond butter, homemade (scroll down the post for recipe) or store bought
Toasted sunflower seeds
Cacao nibs
Blueberries (for this I used frozen berries) or any seasonal fresh berries or fruit
Honey
Granola – try one of these homemade granolas: basic oat granola, grain free granola or slow roasted apple & rosehip granola

1) Layer all the ingredients in glass jars and top with all of the dry ingredients, or just a few + berries or fruit. Surprise your family or friends by making customized jars for each one of them. Success guaranteed!

Layered yoghurt jars with homemade almond butter & oat granola :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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Five seeds flatbread with avocado, sweet potato and smokey tahini dressing (gluten free, vegan, paleo)

Five seeds flatbread with avocado, sweet potato and smokey tahini dressing  (gluten free, vegan, paleo) :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

I haven’t posted a bread recipe in a while now, which might make you think we don’t like bread or don’t eat bread very often. We absolutely do, but most weeks I don’t put bread baking high on my list of prioritizations. I love to have a Danish rye bread or some kind of sour dough (preferably spelt or rye) on hand for my daily avocado toasts, but most often I buy it at my local bakery. And I always like to have a low carb/high protein option on hand too, and since I first baked this bread about a year ago it is my go-to recipe when in need of a low-carb option. It is perfect for lunches or a light evening meal when you don’t have much time to cook.

The recipe is originally from this book on gluten free bread by Maria Blohm and Jessica Frej. I shot all the photos for the book, and of course also got to try most of the bread in there. I instantly fell in love with the seed bread, originally baked as little round buns, but I sometimes like to make it into a flatbread like in this recipe.

Scroll further down for my fillings suggestion and a super delish tahini dressing with both smoked salt and smoked paprika. Yum – so good with sweet potatoes!

Happy baking!

Five seeds flatbread with avocado, sweet potato and smokey tahini dressing  (gluten free, vegan, paleo) :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Five seeds flatbread (gluten free, vegan, paleo)

makes 6-8 squares

Step 1
6 tbsp (50 g) pumpkin seeds
6 tbsp (50 g) sunflower seeds
4 tbsp (40 g) sesame seeds (unhulled)
2,5 tbsp (20 g) chia seeds
2,5 tbsp (20 g) psyllium seeds
2 tbsp (20 g) rosehip powder
1 cup + 3/4 cup (400 g) water

1) In a large bowl mix all the ingredients for “step 1” and let sit covered at room temperature for at least 5 hours to swell up.

Step 2
1 tsp (3 g) active dry yeast (or 10 g fresh yeast), dissolved in 1 tsp water
3/4 cup (60 g) almond flour (or ground almonds)
6 tbsp (50 g) buckwheat flour
1/2 tsp sea salt
1 tsp (5 g) psyllium husks

seeds of your choice to sprinkle on top (optional)

1) Add the dissolved yeast to the seed mixture and blend well with a wooden spoon or fork. Add the rest of the ingredients in “step 2” and make sure everything is well blended. Cover and leave to rise for three hours.
2) Preheat the oven to 200 ° C (400° F). Transfer the dough to a parchment paper on a baking sheet, and form into a rectangular shape (about 20×30 cm) by flattening the dough with your hands. You can wet your hands with water if you find it sticky.
3) Sprinkle seeds on top (optional) and bake on the middle rack in the oven for 30 minutes or until slightly golden and firm. Remove from the oven and let cool completely covered with a tea towel. Cut the bread into 6-8 squares/rectangles. The bread keeps well in a sealed plastic bag for 3-4 days.

Fillings suggestion
avocado mashed with a squeeze of lemon juice
baked sweet potatoes
finely shredded cabbage (or salad)
radish sprouts
smokey tahini dressing

Smokey tahini dressing (perfect with sweet potatoes!)
4 tbsp tahini
3-4 tbsp water
juice from 1/2 lemon
1/2 garlic clove, finely chopped
¼ tsp smoked sea salt
¼ tsp smoked paprika
¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper

1) Put all ingredients for the dressing in a blender (or use a hand held) and blend well. Add more water if needed to adjust consistency. Store the dressing in an airtight jar or bottle in the fridge until using. Keeps for 5-6 days in the fridge.

Five seeds flatbread with avocado, sweet potato and smokey tahini dressing  (gluten free, vegan, paleo) :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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Hello again and a simple toast with figs and blackberries

A simple toast with figs and blackberries :: Dagmars Kitchen/Sonja Dahlgren

Hello! Just wanted to pop by and say hi after a long summer break to let you know I’m still here. We’ve had a lovely summer, spending time both at home and away – this time in Austria and Italy. I hope you had a fabulous summer too?

In case you follow me on Instagram you have probably noticed that I’ve uploaded several shots of my toasts lately. We don’t eat much bread, but we always have a danish style rye bread in our pantry. And sometimes a lighter sour dough of spelt and/or rye. And it makes such perfect snacks or evening nibbles when you are hungry for a little something along with a cup of coffee, tea or Kombucha (my summer obsession).

Follow me on Instagram for more toast inspiration and remember to play with your toppings – you never know what your next favorite will be! And if you have a favourite topping combo at the moment, please do share in the comment section below!

Enjoy!

A simple toast with figs and blackberries

serves 4

4 slices of rye bread or sour dough
1/2 cup Turkish or Greek style yoghurt (unsweetened), drained in a coffee filter or cheese cloth at least one hour
2 ripe figs, sliced
a handful ripe blackberries
a handful walnuts, lightly toasted and chopped
runny honey, agave or maple syrup
olive oil
fleur de sel

1) Spread the drained yoghurt over bread slices and top with figs and blackberries. Then add walnuts and drizzle with sweetener of your choice, olive oil and season with a little fleur de sel.

A simple toast with figs and blackberries :: Dagmars Kitchen/Sonja Dahlgren

Raspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops

Raspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

While sipping on our morning smoothies a few weeks ago, my 9-year old son asked me: – Mum, are these a 100 % healthy?

You see, we use to talk a lot about the ingredients in certain foods. Discuss the amount of sugars and fats. What sugars are better than others, what differs saturated fat from non-saturated and so on. He also loves to check the percentage of sugars and other not-so-healthy stuff in different foods and drinks.

Raspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

And to return back to his question – the answer was “Yes, I’d say they’re a 100 % healthy”. Our smoothies were made of fruit & berries, yoghurt, oat milk, hemp seeds and sweetened with dates only.

Having said that, we’re still always on the look-out for interesting ideas to inspire us to choose even healthier breakfasts, and to make it easier and more fun to snack healthily. Smoothies are a great option, and they often work great to freeze into ice pops too.

These raspberry and chia seed ice pops are made of very few ingredients, but come together really big in flavor and so deeply satisfying. Rich, creamy and rather irresistible.

And healthy enough for sunny and warm summer breakfasts. Enjoy!

Raspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops

makes 10 (3 ounce/90 ml) pops

2 cups raspberries (frozen or fresh)
2-3 tbsp agave syrup
2 tbsp chia seeds
1/2 vanilla bean, split open and seeds scraped out (optional – tastes great without too)
2 cups (500 ml) full-fat coconut milk

1) Combine the raspberries with the agave syrup in a small saucepan. Cook over low heat for 4-5 minutes until the berries are soft, but not falling apart completely. Remove from the heat and let cool. Alternatively you could make a raw version by simply mashing the berries with the agave syrup.
2) Add chia seeds and vanilla and let the seeds sit for 5-10 minutes to swell up a bit.
3) Stir in the coconut milk and carefully pour the mix into your popsicle molds, making sure the berries are evenly distributed. Freeze for at least 4 hours. The ice pops will last at least a month in the freezer.

TIP! If serving these as a dessert, simply melt 100 g of dark good quality chocolate with 1 tsp coconut oil. Let cool a bit and then dip the ice pops in chocolate and sprinkle with chopped nuts, toasted shredded coconut or granola. Serve on a tray for everyone to choose their favorite!

Raspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenRaspberry & chia coconut milk breakfast ice pops :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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A basic and naturally sweetened oat granola

A basic and naturally sweetened oat granola :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

I once heard that the best ingredient is the one you leave out, and that philosophy resonates very well with me. Because usually when creating recipes I like to let only one or two ingredients be the hero, and then add just a few more to boost the flavours.

And the philosophy seems to be even more true when it comes to my two kids. They like nuts of all kinds, but not when added to a granola. They also like raisins and other dried fruit, but not when added to a granola. They don’t even like fresh berries on granola. But berries on the side works fine.

My kids :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

The idea for the granola recipe I’m sharing today came to me when my 9 year old first tried Start during a hotel stay a while ago. And he loved it. Start is a Swedish granola brand available in most Swedish grocery stores. I am sure you have similar where you live too. It is delicious – almost like cookie crumbles… The only problem is – it contains around 20 % sugar (refined sugar and glucose syrup).

A basic and naturally sweetened oat granola :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

I am not super strict or neurotic about the food we eat. Even if we do try to eat mindfully and healthfully most of the time. But it goes without saying that eating this type of granola is not a habit I’d like to encourage as an everyday food in our house.

So I made my own recipe for homemade “Start”. Only lightly sweetened with maple syrup and agave syrup, and with a light touch of vanilla. And it seems to be working – he likes it!

The recipe is super simple. A basic granola to which you can add your own dried fruit, nuts, seeds or fresh berries if you like. This means that everyone in a family can create the breakfast they like using the same granola base. I like mine with hemp seeds, pistachios and fresh berries. My son likes his “au naturel”.

I hope you like it too. Happy midsummer!

A basic and naturally sweetened oat granola

4 cups instant rolled oats
1 cup thick cut rolled oats
1/2 cup buckwheat flour

6 tbsp neutral coconut oil, melted
4 tbsp maple syrup
3-4 tbsp agave syrup
2-3 tbsp water
3/4 tsp sea salt
1 tsp powdered vanilla

1) Preheat the oven to 95° C (200° F) and line a baking tray with parchment paper.
2) Mix oats and buckwheat flour in a large bowl. In another bowl whisk together coconut oil, maple syrup, agave syrup, water, sea salt and powdered vanilla.
3) Combine all ingredients and mix well with carefully washed hands or a wooden spoon to coat everything. Squeeze the grains a little between your fingers to get it more clustered.
4) Spread the granola mixture out evenly over the baking tray. Pop into the oven and roast for about 4 hours. On this low temperature you don’t even have to stir during roasting – and you will get perfectly roasted and clustered granola without burning. Do check after an hour or two the first time you make it, since the temperature in your oven may vary slightly from the oven I use.
5) Switch off the heat and leave the baking tray in the oven to dry completely while the oven cools.
6) When completely cool, store in an airtight jar for up to a month.

NOTE! Slow roasting is in my opinion the way to get perfectly crunchy granola every time. It does take a few hours, but since the temperature is so low you can easily leave the house for an hour or so and the granola won’t burn.

A basic and naturally sweetened oat granola :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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