Creative Q&A with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö + a giveaway

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

As some of you might know I do (apart from this blog) a lot of editorial work for magazines – mostly gardens, food and lifestyle – and that part of my job is something I really love doing. And even if I love the way I’ve used this blog as my personal creative space where I can grow and experiment creatively, I’ve been wanting for quite some time now to occasionally write about and publish other stuff than my own recipes. And the idea has dwelled in my head for a while now to do interviews with ceramicists whose work I love.

And what could be a better match for a food blog than tableware and ceramics?

So I have decided to start a new series called ‘Creative Q&A’ where I’ll focus on ceramicists that make beautiful every day use objects. Objects that I admire and that you see in use often here on the blog. Today you’ll get to meet Elin Lannsjö – a wonderful person and ceramicist based out of Gothenburg on the west coast of Sweden.

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Elin creates unique, functional and awesomely beautiful objects for everyday use. Each piece is made entirely by hand and topped with glazes in beautiful natural hues. All of the items are produced in small batch runs that will make daily life that much more beautiful.

She says she doesn’t strive for ‘perfection’ in her work. She wants every piece to be unique and with irregularities so that you can see it has been made by human hand.

And with love.

Elin was kind enough to answer a few questions – and to let me have a look inside her little cottage where she often comes alone to work or with her fiancé just to hang out.

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenAn interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Elin Lannsjö
ceramicist
Gothenburg, Sweden
www.elinlannsjo.blogspot.se
instagram.com/elinlannsjo

How long have you been making ceramics for?
I’ve been doing it for six years now.

What was it that made you realize ceramics was something you wanted to spend your days doing?
I’ve always been interested in design which led me to study a few design oriented courses at university about eight years ago. At that time my focus was on textile design, and I experimented a lot with pattern design and so on. It was somewhere during that time that my passion for creative stuff was born. I became fascinated with the creative process of starting with an idea or a vision and then just ‘see what happens’.

It was a little later that my interest for clay started. I took a course to learn the basic methods which gave me a good foundation to start experimenting on my own. Ever since, I have been ‘learning by doing’ and I’ve learned especially much from all the mistakes (she says and smiles)! It is also out of passion and curiosity for the craftsmanship that I’ve learned the most. Because when you learn out of curiosity and on your own terms you learn things suited to your own interests and needs.

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenAn interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Is there anything in particular that inspires you in your creative process?
I love to surround myself with natural elements and materials, and there are of course certain environments where I feel more at ease than others. Environments that trigger my creativity. But creativity is also such an ongoing and abstract process where sometimes you’re not really sure what it was that inspired you in the first place.

When I look actively to be inspired though, I turn to fashion, interiors or beautiful photographs in magazines and on blogs. When I create a piece the process often starts with a shape or an idea that appeals to me and then I just go from there. I often also get inspired during the process of creating my pieces – an unexpected effect in the glaze, or when I during the process discover new qualities of the clay I’m working with that makes me want to try new things.

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenAn interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Your dishes and platters are a perfect canvas for food presentation but also for display of other items in the home or to create beautiful stills around the house. Do you have a certain use in mind when you create a new piece?
The aesthetics is always the most important for me no matter what piece I create. I want my pieces to be beautiful and appealing just to look at. But my vision is also that the pieces should be functional for the every day use of the owner. And last but not least, I also love the idea of when not ‘using’ an item it should be decorative just as it is. Perhaps as an eye-catcher on a windowsill or on a sideboard.

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenAn interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Do you have a personal ‘darling piece’ among your work?
I especially love my large ‘Giant’ urns. They are massive and they take weeks to make. The process of making them is also really interesting since the drying time is quite long and you can change its shape and form as you go. It is a very rewarding and inspiring way to work.

And lastly – a giveaway!
Elin has also been kind enough to share a small dish for a giveaway with one lucky reader. It is the dish named ‘Oh Sailor’ with a hand drawn anchor (pictured below).

Isn’t it just too cute?

If you would like to win, simply leave a comment below. The giveaway will close on Sunday, April 27th. And please make sure to leave your name and contact email so I can get in touch with you. And you are welcome to join in regardless of where you live in the world!

An interview with ceramicist Elin Lannsjö :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

There’s something about chocolate that makes people go crazy. Myself included.

When I was little and started baking it was always chocolate balls made with rolled oats, butter, sugar and cacao. Then I went on to more proper baking like marbled cake, chewy chocolate muffins and nutty chocolate squares. In fact most recipes I can recall had chocolate in them.

These days when my kids want to bake it’s always the traditional swedish chocolate balls (mentioned above) or ‘drömtårta’ {dream cake} – a kind of chocolate swiss roll filled with vanilla buttercream. The kids call it dad’s favorite cake. Simply because that’s about the only cake he likes.

Oh, I have to share that recipe sometime. It’s naturally gluten free by the way.

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Talking about chocolate, there are also certain blog posts that become more popular than others. And they (almost) always have chocolate in them. This is such a blog post. It’s in Swedish and I’ve received tons of emails just because of that post, from people who want to get the recipe in English. And I don’t know how many pins and repins it’s gotten on Pinterest. That is so fascinating!

I believe chocolate is the key to people’s hearts. What do you think?

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

And the thing is. That recipe turned out so great. And ever since, I have been wanting to make a somewhat healthier version of it. So I did some experimenting with natural sweeteners and buckwheat flour. And guess what? It turned out even better than the original recipe.

However, I don’t actually believe you can call a cake ‘healthy’ just by removing the wheat flour and swap the refined sugar for natural sweeteners.

But sweets are for treats right? Meaning we don’t eat them every day anyway. And this is truly a treat. Made a little healthier (and more delicious!) by replacing the wheat flour and the white sugar with healthier alternatives.

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Other chocolatey treats you might want to try right now are these little Sarah Bernard biscuits from Green Kitchen Stories, this god-sent creation from Dolly and Oatmeal or this dreamy decadent loaf cake from The Vanilla Bean Blog.

These blog posts all make me wish I had more time to bake in my life!

And to celebrate spring I think you should decorate everything with pansies. Chocolate suits them, don’t you think?

Oh, and I almost forgot – if you read Swedish you can find a little interview with me over at Femina, where I also share my recipe for sunchoke soup with steamed blue mussels.

Now, here’s the brownie recipe. Enjoy!


Printable recipe
Utskriftsvänligt recept

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting

12-20 squares depending on size

175 g butter
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (100 g) coconut sugar (you can use raw cane sugar or granulated fine sugar if you like)
6 tbsp (60 g) light muscovado sugar
6 tbsp (40 g) powdered cacao of good quality (e.g. Valrhona)
3 tbsp maple syrup
1/2 tsp sea salt
3 eggs
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (90 g) buckwheat flour
50 g bittersweet chocolate of good quality, roughly chopped (I use Valrhona Caraibe)

Salted fudge frosting
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp heavy cream
3 tbsp milk
3 tbsp maple syrup
200 g bittersweet chocolate of good quality, roughly chopped
1/2 tsp sea salt
pistachios, roughly chopped
edible flowers, optional

1) Preheat the oven to 180° C (350 ° F). Line a small baking tray (ca. 20×30 cm) with buttered parchment paper.
2) Using an electric hand mixer or a table-top mixer whisk the butter and sugars together until creamy and fluffy. Add cacao, maple syrup and salt using a rubber spatula.
3) Add the eggs (one at a time) to the mixture. When all the egg has been incorporated, gently fold in the buckwheat flour and the chopped chocolate still using your rubber spatula.
4) Scrape the mixture into the baking tray and spread it out very gently. Bake for about 20-25 minutes until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean or just a little sticky. Let cool a bit before lifting the cake out of the tray. Then cool completely on a wire rack.
5) For the frosting, bring cream, milk and maple syrup just to the boil and then pour it over the chopped chocolate. Let sit for a minute or two and then stir until smooth and well mixed. Add the salt and let cool.
6) When the cake is completely cooled, spread the frosting over the cake. Sprinkle with the chopped pistachios and put in the fridge to set for 30-60 minutes before cutting it.

Decorate with pansies (or other edible flowers) and enjoy! The brownies keep well in the freezer for up to three months.

Gluten free double chocolate brownies with salted fudge frosting :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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Bread memories and A rye soda bread with homemade goat’s curd

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

When I grew up in the 80s my mother was a stay at home mum and she was always there when me and my two brothers got home after school. There was often some kind of cooking or baking going on and at least once a week the smell of freshly baked bread welcomed us home.

That smell was wonderful. And baking days were the best. I remember coming home to that smell. It was heaven to sit down in the kitchen with a couple slices of fresh bread with plenty of butter while doing the homework.

Happy days.

I’m sure you have some sweet memories of bread as well, right?

I’d love to hear about them.

Rye soda bread :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

These days we don’t eat bread on a daily basis in our household. Mainly because I feel better on a somewhat low-carb diet and P does too. It doesn’t mean I never eat bread though. But when I do it has to be proper bread. I usually get it at Cum Pane or Da Matteo Bakery.

And when (and if) I bake bread at home it has to be fast. You see, I never plan ahead for such things to happen. Let’s just say there’s always too many other food related projects going on.

I used to love the process of baking though. But that was years ago. Before kids and before I had a food related job.

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

However. Soda bread is my simple solution to home made bread, and the recipe I will share with you today has been my go-to recipe for a while now. It’s an adaption of this recipe that I got from a colleague a few years ago. To make it healthier I removed all the treacle in the original recipe and replaced it with the sweetness of an apple and a tiny bit of maple syrup.

This bread is ridiculously simple and quick to make, yet great in taste and with a wonderful crust on the outside and super moist on the inside. You wouldn’t actually believe it’s a soda bread unless you already knew. And as a little bonus I have created a gluten free version of the bread as well – so enjoy and feel free to choose which recipe suits you best!

And the goat’s curd? You might think that’s a complicated thing to make at home. But in fact it’s incredibly easy to knock off. I had never tried something like it before, but when I found a recipe in this book I instantly knew I had to try. It was just one of those things I couldn’t stop thinking about. And I can strongly recommend the book too – it’s brilliant!

Goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Now, I’ll leave you with the recipes and hope you have a wonderful weekend! Be back soon.


Printable recipes (bread and goat’s curd)
Utskriftsvänliga recept (bröd och färsk getost)

Rye soda bread

makes one loaf of bread (you can double the recipe for two loafs)

1 1/2 cup (160 g) fine rye flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (100 g) wholemeal rye flour
1/2 cup (60 g) buckwheat flour (can be replaced with more fine rye flour)
1 1/2 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate)
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup hazelnuts (can be replaced with e.g. pumpkin seeds if allergic to nuts)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/4 cup flax seeds
1/2 cup dried figs or apricots

1 apple, grated
3 tbsp maple syrup
2 cups unsweetened yoghurt

pumpkin seeds and wholemeal rye to sprinkle

1) Preheat the oven to 200° C (400° F). Butter a loaf tin with butter or coconut oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
2) In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients. Add the wet ingredients and mix carefully using a rubber spatula until you have a smooth batter.
3) Spread the batter out evenly in the loaf tin and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and a little wholemeal rye flour.
4) Bake for 1 hour in the lower part of your oven. Then lower the temperature to 175° C (350° F) and bake for 30 more minutes.
5) Take the bread out and let cool a little before removing it from the tin. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

The bread keeps for up to five days wrapped in a tea towel.

TIP! Just add the nuts, seeds and dried fruit whole – no chopping needed.

Soda bread (gluten free)

makes one loaf of bread

3/4 cup + 2 tbsp (90 g) amaranth or quinoa flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (60 g) gluten free oat flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (80 g) brown rice flour
1/2 cup (60 g) buckwheat flour
1 1/2 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate)
1 tsp sea salt
2 tsp psyllium husks
1/2 cup hazelnuts (can be replaced with e.g. pumpkin seeds if allergic to nuts)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/4 cup flax seeds
1/2 cup dried figs or apricots

1 apple, grated
3 tbsp maple syrup
2 cups unsweetened yoghurt

pumpkin seeds and buckwheat flour to sprinkle

1) Preheat the oven to 200° C (400° F). Butter a loaf tin with butter or coconut oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
2) In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients. Add the wet ingredients and mix carefully using a rubber spatula until you have a smooth batter.
3) Spread the batter out evenly in the loaf tin and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and a little buckwheat flour.
4) Bake for 1 hour in the lower part of your oven. Then lower the temperature to 175° C (350° F) and bake for 30 more minutes.
5) Take the bread out and let cool a little before removing it from the tin. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

A gluten free bread is easier to slice if completely cooled. The bread keeps for up to five days wrapped in a tea towel.

TIP! Just add the nuts, seeds and dried fruit whole – no chopping needed.

Rye soda bread :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Goat’s curd

makes about 175 g (6oz)

1 litre (1 3/4 pints) goat’s milk
1 tbsp rennet
2 tbsp lemon juice
sea salt

1) Heat the milk to 25° C (77° F). Stir in the rennet and lemon juice, cover and leave for an hour. I haven’t tried leaving out the rennet myself, but according to this the lemon juice alone will do the job. So feel free to try if you can’t find rennet where you live or if you’re vegan.
2) Line a colander with muslin/cheese cloth and strain the mixture through the muslin (over a bowl or the sink). Gather the corners of the muslin to make a kind of bag and hang it to drip for a couple of hours (use the tap over the sink, or a door handle where it can drip into a bowl). It should be thick, but if you’d like it thicker, just leave to drip for longer.
3) Tip the cheese out of the muslin and into a bowl. Season with salt and gently mix this in. Cover and keep in the fridge.

Enjoy the cheese with your soda bread drizzled with olive oil and topped with thyme/sprouts/shoots.

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenRye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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A juice-detox, a creamy avocado smoothie and a fresh spring salad with poached cod

A fresh spring salad with poached cod :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Friends often ask me if I always eat as healthily as it appears on the blog. My answer is always yes. And no.

I’ve tried an array of “healthy” flours, good fats, natural sweeteners and “odd” vegetables. And overall my diet is a healthy one with almost entirely organic whole foods, nuts, seeds, fish & seafood and lots of veg. I’m not super strict or neurotic about the food I cook and eat though, but over time I’ve made conscious decisions to shift my everyday habits.

Shift to habits that work for me.

I need to add though that first and foremost I think food should be delicious and fun. It shouldn’t be about restrictions. That stuff just makes us anxious and feeling guilty every time we eat something that is not on the list of “healthy foods”.

And healthy eating to me doesn’t mean every meal during a day has to be super healthy. That I cannot let myself have an occasional croissant if the mood strikes me. Or that we can’t, between the four of us in the family, share a bag of potato crisps on a friday night.

To me a healthy lifestyle is to aim for a balance overall and to eat mindfully and with moderation. To be aware of the pitfalls (often white stuff like wheat flour, refined sugar and processed foods) and to find a way of healthy eating that suits the life you live.

What’s does healthy eating mean to you?

Fresh herbs in my kitchen :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

That said I suddenly felt that I needed a change. I had somehow lost track way too often of that healthy path. And I was feeling tired. My skin was dull and my stomach often bloated. I know it is March and everyone feels this way after a long dark winter. Perhaps especially here up north.

But I wasn’t feeling good about myself and I had to do something about it. A three days’ juice fast seemed like the perfect idea. Not to loose weight (mind you!), but to get a kickstart to get on that healthy track again.

So the first three days this week I was on a juice-detox inspired by Renée Voltaire’s book Juice Power and Detox. I had about three liters of fresh veg- and fruit juice every day. And on top of that loads of herbal tea and water.

That head ache the second day almost killed me. But the third day I felt great again and now that the fast is over I don’t feel tempted to stray too much from my healthy path again. It truly was a kick start! And I can really recommend a 1-3 days’ detox/fast if you feel you need to kickstart your body for spring.

It isn’t hard to make good juices. All you need is a juicer and loads of veg and fruit. I normally use a lot of ginger and lemon for all of my juices because they help balance the tastes whether it’s a veg juice or a sweeter fruit juice – or a mix. And I won’t be giving you any recipes for juices – there are loads of them out there. My favorite though is beets, celery, apple, lemon and ginger.

What I found the hardest when fasting was to find a healthy but filling drink for those times of the day when you’re feeling awfully hungry and really need a “pick me up” drink. And that’s when this creamy, chocolatey avocado thing with raspberries saved me!

A creamy avocado and almond milk smoothie with raw cacao and raspberries :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

So today I will share with you both the recipe for that creamy smoothie treat and the spring inspired salad that was my first proper lunch after the fast (oh boy, it tasted so good!).

Enjoy and happy weekend to you all!


Printable recipe – avocado smoothie

Creamy avocado and almond milk smoothie with raw cacao and raspberries

for 1 if replacing a meal during a fast/detox or for 2 as a snack in between meals

2 cups (approx. 500 ml) almond milk (or milk of your choice)
1 avocado (banana works too, but I like avocado better)
2 tbsp raw cacao
1 tsp vanilla extract (or 1/2 vanilla pod seeds scraped out)
1-2 tbsp agave syrup
pinch of sea salt

For the raspberries

250 g raspberries (thawed if using frozen)
2 tbsp agave syrup

1) Bring raspberries and agave syrup to a boil and cook for 4-5 minutes until soft and runny. Set aside. This can be made in larger batches and kept in the fridge for up to five days.
2) Mix all the ingredients for the smoothie to a creamy consistency in a blender.
3) Divide a couple spoonfuls of the raspberries between two glasses and pour the smoothie over. Have a spoon ready to be able to scrape all the goodness out!

TIP! If you’d like to make the smoothie a little more filling e.g. for breakfast you can add a couple spoonfuls almond flour or cashew nuts (soaked over night).


Printable recipe – spring salad

A fresh spring salad with poached cod

serves 2

1 small chioggia beet, scrubbed and thinly sliced (a mandolin is of good use here)
6 radishes, thinly sliced
4 spring onions, chopped
a good bunch of pea shoots
bunch of dill fronds
bunch of flat-leaf parsley leaves
edible flowers (optional)

For the dressing

2 tbsp rape seed oil or olive oil
1/2 tbsp white balsamic vinegar
a squeeze of lemon
sea salt to taste

1) Whisk all ingredients for the dressing together.
2) Toss the salad with the dressing and serve with poached cod.

Poached cod

250 g fresh cod
water enough to cover
1-2 tsp sea salt

1) Cut the cod in two pieces. Bring the water to a boil/simmer and add the fish in a single layer, making sure it is completely covered with liquid. Cover and cook for 5-6 minutes until the fish flesh flakes easily.
2) Use a skimmer to pick up the fish and place it on the plates with the salad on the side.

A fresh spring salad with poached cod :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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Jerusalem artichoke soup with steamed blue mussels

Jerusalem artichoke soup with steamed blue mussels :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

It’s that time of year again. The light is slowly returning.

And even if we didn’t have much of a winter here in the western parts of Sweden it is starting to feel a bit like spring. It’s getting lighter each day and on my morning jogs lately I’ve been hearing the birds sing. And another sure sign that spring is on its way is the awakening of overwintered pelargoniums.

I know, it is still winter. Even if many of us (including me) are eager for spring.

But the signs are there. Little by little every day.

Pelargonium :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenStill life :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

This is also the best time of year to eat mussels. Many people think of mussels and other shellfish as summer food, but in fact they are at its very best from december-april. In Scandinavia anyway.

So we’ve had mussels. And I’ve been pruning pelargoniums.

Jerusalem artichoke soup with steamed blue mussels :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Mussels are wonderful paired with Jerusalem artichokes – also called sun chokes (in Swedish jordärtskocka) – and I often make this smooth soup with Jerusalem artichokes and a hint of white wine to go with steamed mussels. It’s delicious. You should try!

Need I say this is perfect for a friday night?

What’s your favorite way to eat mussels?


Utskriftsvänligt recept
Printable recipe

Steamed blue mussels

serves 4

2 pounds (about 1 kg) blue mussels
2 2/3 cup (400 ml) water

1) First prepare the mussels. Scrub each mussel individually and check to make sure their shells are tightly closed. Discard mussels with cracked shells. If any mussels are open, tap them gently against the counter and discard any mussels that don’t close up within a few minutes. Debeard the mussels by pinching the “beard” between your thumb and first finger. Use a side to side motion and firmly tug the beard out. The beard isn’t harmful or inedible so don’t worry if there are a few little threads left that you can’t grasp.
2) In a large pot bring the water to a boil and then gently add the mussels. Cover and cook over medium high heat until the mussels open, about 5 minutes. Reserve the liquid and keep the mussels in the pot with lid on.

Jerusalem artichokes & blue mussels :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Jerusalem artichoke soup

1 pound (about 500 g) Jerusalem artichokes
1 onion
1 small leek
1 clove garlic
1 tbsp butter + 1 tbsp olive oil
reserved liquid from mussels + 2 cups (about 500 ml) vegetable stock
6 tbsp white wine
6 tbsp cream
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
sea salt & white pepper to taste
fresh thyme

1) Peel the Jerusalem artichokes and cut them into smaller chunks. To prevent from darkening drop the pieces into lemon- or vinegar water while peeling the remaining Jerusalem artichokes. Peel and chop the onion, leek and garlic clove finely.
2) In a medium pot, melt the butter/olive oil over medium heat. Add the jerusalem artichokes, onion, leek and garlic. Cook on medium low heat for about 5-7 minutes until slightly softened (do not brown). Add the reserved mussel liquid, vegetable stock and wine. Bring to a boil, cover the pot and simmer for 10 minutes. Add the cream and simmer for 5 more minutes.
3) Add the balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper to taste and puree the soup in a blender.

Serve the Jerusalem artichoke soup with the mussels and sprinkle with fresh thyme.

Jerusalem artichoke soup with steamed blue mussels :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

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