Bread memories and A rye soda bread with homemade goat’s curd

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

When I grew up in the 80s my mother was a stay at home mum and she was always there when me and my two brothers got home after school. There was often some kind of cooking or baking going on and at least once a week the smell of freshly baked bread welcomed us home.

That smell was wonderful. And baking days were the best. I remember coming home to that smell. It was heaven to sit down in the kitchen with a couple slices of fresh bread with plenty of butter while doing the homework.

Happy days.

I’m sure you have some sweet memories of bread as well, right?

I’d love to hear about them.

Rye soda bread :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

These days we don’t eat bread on a daily basis in our household. Mainly because I feel better on a somewhat low-carb diet and P does too. It doesn’t mean I never eat bread though. But when I do it has to be proper bread. I usually get it at Cum Pane or Da Matteo Bakery.

And when (and if) I bake bread at home it has to be fast. You see, I never plan ahead for such things to happen. Let’s just say there’s always too many other food related projects going on.

I used to love the process of baking though. But that was years ago. Before kids and before I had a food related job.

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

However. Soda bread is my simple solution to home made bread, and the recipe I will share with you today has been my go-to recipe for a while now. It’s an adaption of this recipe that I got from a colleague a few years ago. To make it healthier I removed all the treacle in the original recipe and replaced it with the sweetness of an apple and a tiny bit of maple syrup.

This bread is ridiculously simple and quick to make, yet great in taste and with a wonderful crust on the outside and super moist on the inside. You wouldn’t actually believe it’s a soda bread unless you already knew. And as a little bonus I have created a gluten free version of the bread as well – so enjoy and feel free to choose which recipe suits you best!

And the goat’s curd? You might think that’s a complicated thing to make at home. But in fact it’s incredibly easy to knock off. I had never tried something like it before, but when I found a recipe in this book I instantly knew I had to try. It was just one of those things I couldn’t stop thinking about. And I can strongly recommend the book too – it’s brilliant!

Goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Now, I’ll leave you with the recipes and hope you have a wonderful weekend! Be back soon.


Printable recipes (bread and goat’s curd)
Utskriftsvänliga recept (bröd och färsk getost)

Rye soda bread

makes one loaf of bread (you can double the recipe for two loafs)

1 1/2 cup (160 g) fine rye flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (100 g) wholemeal rye flour
1/2 cup (60 g) buckwheat flour (can be replaced with more fine rye flour)
1 1/2 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate)
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup hazelnuts (can be replaced with e.g. pumpkin seeds if allergic to nuts)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/4 cup flax seeds
1/2 cup dried figs or apricots

1 apple, grated
3 tbsp maple syrup
2 cups unsweetened yoghurt

pumpkin seeds and wholemeal rye to sprinkle

1) Preheat the oven to 200° C (400° F). Butter a loaf tin with butter or coconut oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
2) In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients. Add the wet ingredients and mix carefully using a rubber spatula until you have a smooth batter.
3) Spread the batter out evenly in the loaf tin and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and a little wholemeal rye flour.
4) Bake for 1 hour in the lower part of your oven. Then lower the temperature to 175° C (350° F) and bake for 30 more minutes.
5) Take the bread out and let cool a little before removing it from the tin. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

The bread keeps for up to five days wrapped in a tea towel.

TIP! Just add the nuts, seeds and dried fruit whole – no chopping needed.

Soda bread (gluten free)

makes one loaf of bread

3/4 cup + 2 tbsp (90 g) amaranth or quinoa flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (60 g) gluten free oat flour
1/2 cup + 2 tbsp (80 g) brown rice flour
1/2 cup (60 g) buckwheat flour
1 1/2 tsp baking soda (bicarbonate)
1 tsp sea salt
2 tsp psyllium husks
1/2 cup hazelnuts (can be replaced with e.g. pumpkin seeds if allergic to nuts)
1/2 cup sunflower seeds
1/4 cup flax seeds
1/2 cup dried figs or apricots

1 apple, grated
3 tbsp maple syrup
2 cups unsweetened yoghurt

pumpkin seeds and buckwheat flour to sprinkle

1) Preheat the oven to 200° C (400° F). Butter a loaf tin with butter or coconut oil and sprinkle with sesame seeds.
2) In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients. Add the wet ingredients and mix carefully using a rubber spatula until you have a smooth batter.
3) Spread the batter out evenly in the loaf tin and sprinkle with pumpkin seeds and a little buckwheat flour.
4) Bake for 1 hour in the lower part of your oven. Then lower the temperature to 175° C (350° F) and bake for 30 more minutes.
5) Take the bread out and let cool a little before removing it from the tin. Let cool completely on a wire rack.

A gluten free bread is easier to slice if completely cooled. The bread keeps for up to five days wrapped in a tea towel.

TIP! Just add the nuts, seeds and dried fruit whole – no chopping needed.

Rye soda bread :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

Goat’s curd

makes about 175 g (6oz)

1 litre (1 3/4 pints) goat’s milk
1 tbsp rennet
2 tbsp lemon juice
sea salt

1) Heat the milk to 25° C (77° F). Stir in the rennet and lemon juice, cover and leave for an hour. I haven’t tried leaving out the rennet myself, but according to this the lemon juice alone will do the job. So feel free to try if you can’t find rennet where you live or if you’re vegan.
2) Line a colander with muslin/cheese cloth and strain the mixture through the muslin (over a bowl or the sink). Gather the corners of the muslin to make a kind of bag and hang it to drip for a couple of hours (use the tap over the sink, or a door handle where it can drip into a bowl). It should be thick, but if you’d like it thicker, just leave to drip for longer.
3) Tip the cheese out of the muslin and into a bowl. Season with salt and gently mix this in. Cover and keep in the fridge.

Enjoy the cheese with your soda bread drizzled with olive oil and topped with thyme/sprouts/shoots.

Rye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's KitchenRye soda bread and homemade goat's curd :: Sonja Dahlgren/Dagmar's Kitchen

show hide 17 comments

Sini | my blue&white kitchen - March 21, 2014 - 2:16 pm

Simply lovely, Sonja. The photographs are amazing – I adore your food styling so very much. This little space of yours has turned into one of my most favorite places here on the internet. Thank you so much for sharing this all with us.
And the recipe? It calls my name. I love to work with yeast and don’t mind the time it takes to work with but I’m also into soda bread (Heidi Swanson from 101 Cookbooks has some great ones I’ve enjoyed every now and then). Being half Bavarian, I have a special relationship with bread. It’s something I feel deeply passionate about. There are so many precious memories are built around it! Will hopefully make the recipe already this weekend. Will let you know how it turned out.

Have a lovely weekend,

Sini

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - March 21, 2014 - 3:07 pm

Sini – Thank you ever so much! Your comments really mean a lot to me – they are always straight from the heart and very thoughtful. I will check Heidi’s recipes out, haven’t seen any of them. Thanks for the tip!

Valentina Hortus - March 23, 2014 - 9:55 am

I really love this whole post. I want to make rye bread too, and I will totally refer to this. Mine won’t be a gluten free version but I will think of you fondly :) It is funny because I, too, stick to a low carb diet, so I usually make bread for people around me. Rye, though, is one of the best carbs you can possibly have.

And the goat’s curd! I love anything made with goat milk. Goat milk ice cream is also pretty awesome!

Awesome pictures, of course.
I’ll let you know how baking goes ;)

Juliana - March 23, 2014 - 8:54 pm

Beautiful styling and photos!

Bread baking is something I love to do and try to do regularly, whether it be a loaf which rises over night, yeasty rolls for dinner, soda bread (I use the recipe from River Cottage) or braided sweeter breads such as brioche or challah. My heart belongs to German breads and my mother brings me a loaf when she comes to visit. I have yet to perfect the German sourdough bread with rye, sometimes with a sprinkling of caraway. I need only smell it, and I’m transported back to my childhood.

Yes, bread harbors many happy memories!

Karin A - March 23, 2014 - 9:17 pm

Åh så gott och vacker Sonja! Måste absolut testa att göra brödet. :) Otroligt vackra bilder dessutom. Ha en fin vecka!

Kram Karin

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - March 24, 2014 - 10:45 am

Valentina – Thank you so much! I agree – rye is one of the best sources of carbs. Great in taste, filling and healthy. Hope you have a great week!

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - March 24, 2014 - 10:48 am

Juliana – Thank you! I understand you have a deep passion for bread – wonderful to hear about your happy bread memories!

Karin – tack snälla! Ja,vill man ha snabbt, gott och nyttigt bröd (vem vill inte det?) så är det helt fantastiskt. Dessutom väldigt enkelt att variera med tex. dinkelmjöl, andra nötter etc. Ha en riktigt härlig vecka i vårsolen! Kram

Daniela - March 24, 2014 - 11:24 am

This looks absolutely amazing!

I just found your blog and am completely in love with it. I will for sure try out many of your recipes.

Ha det så bra!

Amanda @ Once Upon a Recipe - March 25, 2014 - 5:52 am

Nothing beats freshly baked bread. This looks lovely, especially with the goat’s curd. Yum!

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - March 25, 2014 - 11:12 am

Daniela – thank you/tack så mycket! Roligt att du hittat hit – välkommen tillbaka :-)

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - March 25, 2014 - 11:14 am

Amanda – thank you! Yup, you should try the goat’s curd – it’s delish!

Lauren - April 1, 2014 - 2:15 pm

Thank you for the post and recipe! I have a question about the flours: in the recipe, could I just use all “whole grain rye flour” instead of part buckwheat and part “fine rye flour”? I can’t find fine rye flour or buckwheat where I live. Would it just result in a heavier loaf? Thank you!

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - April 1, 2014 - 2:24 pm

Lauren – thank you! The only thing is that soda bread often needs a certain amount of lighter flour in order to rise, so if you can’t find a light/fine version of rye (or buckwheat) you could use wheat flour or even better, spelt flour instead. I have experimented a lot with this recipe and almost everything worked so far. Wishing you the best of luck and please let me know if you do try it!

Ulrica {Från sött till salt} - April 3, 2014 - 12:26 pm

Nu har jag skaffat cykel så det bör gå snabbt och enkelt att åka förbi Gudagott efter jobbet någon dag och se om jag får tag på getmjölk. :)

/Ulrica

Sonja {Dagmar's Kitchen} - April 5, 2014 - 3:51 pm

Ulrica – härligt med cykel! Ring eller messa dem via Instagram först bara. Jag vet att den där getmjölken brukar vara ganska poppis så det kan vara bra att beställa i förväg! Lycka till!

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